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Globalseaweed

Course

My seaweed looks weird

Part of a suite of short courses on seaweed aquaculture developed by SAMS to explore best practice in seaweed cultivation


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Research

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Rationale:

Worldwide, the seaweed aquaculture industry has been developing at an unabated exponential pace over the past six decades. China, Japan, and Korea are world leaders in term of quantities produced, with other Asiatic countries having an increasingly significant contribution (e.g. Indonesia, Malaysia and Philippines). Seaweed cultivation has also been growing fast in South America and East Africa.  On the other hand, the UK, European and North American countries have a long tradition of excellent blue sky research in phycology, but little experience in industrial algal cultivation. This project aims to create a global ambitious network of partners tackling emerging issues in seaweed cultivation (e.g. pests, invasives, pathogens), using a combination of two-way knowledge transfer and community-oriented research activities. It supports several UK and UNU priority areas, such as food safety, sustainable use of the marine environment and biodiversity. It aims to achieve sustainability and global societal impact through SAMS association to the UNU.
 

Pests are major threat to global seaweed aquaculture

The most serious economic and environmental concern that immediately arises with the introduction of new farming practices, including cultivated seaweeds, is the loss of crops to pests (pathogens, native or non-native fouling organisms, grazers, etc..). A global, proactive research agenda on pests is urgently needed to secure the sustainability and future success of the seaweed industry. As in agriculture, the main avenue towards this aim is genetic improvement of breeds, with disease resistance being one of the most desirable trait to introgress. However, in stark contrast to land-based agriculture, genetic and molecular determinants of seaweed resistance to biotic and abiotic stressors are dramatically understudied, and this also holds true for the nature and epidemiology of seaweed pathogens.

To fill those knowledge gaps, the GlobalSeaweed project connects world leading  scientists to support and perform pioneering research activities including:               

*Pathogen identification, culture, and biobanking

*Identification of defense-related genes in red and brown algae

*Exploitation of the model organism E.siliculosus to study algal pathology

*Identification of seaweed pathogens virulence determinants using NGS genomic and transcriptomic strategies

 

For more info on GlobalSeaweed, please contact:

GlobalSeaweed - GlobalSeaweed@sams.ac.uk

Research: Dr Claire Gachon - Claire.Gachon@sams.ac.uk

Teaching and Events: Dr Yacine Badis - Yacine.Badis@sams.ac.uk

Policy: Dr Elizabeth Cook - Elizabeth.Cook@sams.ac.uk

 

Project details

  •     Duration: Apr 2014-Mar 2017
  •     Lead scientist: Claire Gachon
  •     Main Partners: Juliet Brodie (Natural History Museum, London), Philippe Potin (Station Biologique Roscoff, France), Adeel Zafar (UNU-INWEH, Canada), Gwang-Hoon Kim (Institute of Biotechnology, Kongju National University, Korea), Celine Rebours (NIBIO, Norway)
  •     Funder: NERC IOF Pump-priming + scheme (NE/L013223/1)
     

Project details

  • Duration: Apr 2014-Mar 2017
  • Lead scientist: Claire Gachon
  • Main Partners: Juliet Brodie (Natural History Museum, London), Philippe Potin (Station Biologique Roscoff, France), Adeel Zafar (UNU-INWEH, Canada), Gwang-Hoon Kim (Institute of Biotechnology, Kongju National University, Korea), Celine Rebours (BIOFORSK, Norway)
  • Funder: NERC IOF Pump-priming + scheme (NE/L013223/1)
- See more at: http://www.sams.ac.uk/claire-gachon/globalseaweed/?searchterm=global%20seaweed#sthash.BerIGD91.dpuf

Policy

Policy

The worldwide macroalgae industry has increased exponentially over the last fifty years. However, increasingly rapid seaweed domestication brings along many crucial challenges. Invasiveness, crop-to-wild gene flow and impacts of pests on native stocks are only few of the many examples that can incur huge environmental and economical damage.

 The objective of the GlobalSeaweed project is to support the formulation of UK and worldwide seaweed aquaculture policy to ensure industrial sustainability as well as environmental protection. GlobalSeaweed is connecting policy experts and scientistsall over the world, to produce peer reviewed science-based policy recommandations. This material will be further translated as a UNU Policy Brief, leading to application to UNU as International Project Office (IPO) on Sustainable Seaweed Aquaculture.

 
UNU Policy Brief
Contact us
SAMS
Scottish Marine Institute
Oban, Argyll, PA37 1QA
T: 01631 559000
F: 01631 559001
E: info@sams.ac.uk

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