Dr Nicholas Carey


        Head and shoulder photo of Dr Nicholas Carey in the office

Ecophysiologist PDRA

I am an ecophysiologist with broad interests in animal energetics. I study how body size interacts with warming and ocean acidification to affect the ecology and physiology of marine fish and invertebrates. I use both experimental and modelling approaches.

Contact details:

Summary of research interests

  • >How climate warming affects the growth and metabolism of marine invertebrates and fish
  • >How body size mediates responses to climate change
  • >Metabolic scaling, how body size affects metabolic rate
  • >Respirometry
  • >Swimming kinematics and escape performance of fish
  • >R programming and modelling

 

Current research project

CLIMSHIFT: This project explores how climate warming affects the growth and metabolism of marine invertebrates and fish. Funded by NERC. Oct 2017 - Mar 2020

 

Peer-reviewed publications

Nicholas Carey & Jeremy Goldbogen (2017). Kinematics of ram filter feeding and beat–glide swimming in the northern anchovy Engraulis mordax.
Journal of Experimental Biology, 220(15). 10.1242/jeb.158337

Julia D. Sigwart, Lauren H. Sumner-Rooney, James Dickey, Nicholas Carey (2017). The scaphopod foot is ventral: more evidence from the anatomy of Rhabdus rectius (Carpenter, 1864) (Dentaliida: Rhabdidae). Molluscan Research, 37(2). Link

Nicholas Carey, Januar Harianto, Maria Byrne. (2016). Sea urchins in a high CO₂ world: partitioned effects of body-size, ocean warming and acidification on metabolic rate. Journal of Experimental Biology, 219(8). 10.1242/jeb.136101

Nicholas Carey, Sam Dupont, Julia D. Sigwart. (2016). The sea hare Aplysia punctata(Mollusca: Gastropoda) can maintain shell calcification under extreme ocean acidification. Biological Bulletin, 231(2). 10.1086\690094

Nicholas Carey & Julia D. Sigwart. (2014). Size matters: plasticity in metabolic scaling shows body-size may modulate responses to climate change.
Biology Letters, 10(8), 20140408. 10.1098/rsbl.2014.0408

Nicholas Carey, Sam T. Dupont, Bengt Lundve, Julia D. Sigwart. (2014). One size fits all: stability of metabolic scaling under warming and ocean acidification in echinoderms. Marine Biology, 161(9). 10.1007/s00227-014-2493-8

Julia D. Sigwart, Nicholas Carey. (2014). Grazing under experimental hypercapnia and elevated temperature does not affect the radulae of a chiton (Mollusca, Polyplacophora, Lepidopleurida). Marine Environmental Research10.1016/j.marenvres.2014.05.004

Julia D. Sigwart, Nicholas Carey, Patrick Orr. (2014). How subtle are the biases that shape the fidelity of the fossil record? A test using marine molluscs. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 403, 119-127. 10.1016/j.palaeo.2014.02.025

Nicholas Carey, Julia D. Sigwart, Jeffrey G. Richards. (2013). Economies of scaling: More evidence that allometry of metabolism is linked to activity, metabolic rate and habitat. Journal of Experimental Marine Biology & Ecology, 439. 10.1016/j.jembe.2012.10.013

Nicholas Carey, Alexander Galkin, Patrik Henriksson, Jeffrey G. Richards, Julia D. Sigwart. (2013). Variation in oxygen consumption among ‘living fossils’ (Mollusca: Polyplacophora). Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the UK, 93, 197-207. 10.1017/S0025315412000653

 

Other research outputs

respR: An R package for processing and analysis of respirometry data

loomeR: An R package for analysing escape responses using looming

Employment history

Since 2017: Postdoctoral researcher at SAMS

2015-17: Postdoctoral researcher. Goldbogen Lab, Hopkins Marine Station, Stanford University (USA)

2014-15: Postdoctoral researcher. Byrne Lab, University of Sydney (Australia)

 

Education

2013 PhD Marine Biology. Queen's University Belfast

2010 MSc Conservation Biology. Queen's University Belfast

2009 BSc Marine Environment Science. Southampton Solent University & University of Oslo

 

Professional memberships

Society for Experimental Biology

Fisheries Society of the British Isles

British Ecological Society