SAMS news room

Night-time working helps scientists to see the light

Arctic researchers worked during the 24-hour darkness of the polar night to assess how marine organisms respond to light. Photo by Michael O. Snyder
Arctic researchers worked during the 24-hour darkness of the polar night to assess how marine organisms respond to light. Photo by Michael O. Snyder
Night-time working helps scientists to see the light

Marine scientists have used the cover of darkness to expose how ‘light pollution’ is affecting creatures in the Arctic Ocean. Working during the depths of the constantly dark Arctic winter in January 2018, a team of Norwegian and UK researchers used a novel strategy of switching off every source of light, plunging themselves into complete darkness, to examine the marine biology of the polar north.

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Coastal creatures like purple topshells (Gibbula umbilicalis) are among the warm-water affinity species on the increase in Scotland.

Tue, Mar 10, '20

How climate change affects our coastal creatures

Warming waters force marine communities into big moves

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Dr Emily Venables lets the Ullapool Sea Savers see marine robotics at close hand during a tour of SAMS

Fri, Feb 28, '20

Seasavers reunited with gliders

Young conservationists inspired by SAMS visit

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Attendees at a SAMS workshop on the sustainability of Scottish seaweed cultivation note the hopes and risks for a future industry.

Tue, Feb 25, '20

Interest in seaweed cultivation is growing

When Oban became the seaweed capital of Scotland

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